Emerson on Individual Uprightness and Opposing the Oppression of the Masses

Emerson on Individual Uprightness and Opposing the Oppression of the Masses
Emerson

"Masses are inconsiderate, weak, unmade, vindictive in their requests and impact… I wish not to yield anything to them, but rather to tame, bore, separation, and split them up, and coax people out of them.”

"When you receive the models and the estimations of another person," Eleanor Roosevelt wrote in her ageless contemplation on joy and congruity, "you surrender your own respectability [and] move toward becoming, to the degree of your surrender, to a lesser extent an individual." But then we exist inside a general public, as individual particles that coagulate into the purported masses, inundated with societal guidelines that regularly pervade our cognizance without our cognizant assent or even mindfulness. How, then, do we intervene between the inevitable social measurement of our lives and the unassailable uprightness of individual personhood?

Wedged in time between Søren Kierkegaard's sharp knowledge into the brain research of similarity and Nobel laureate Elias Canetti's sharp treatise on group and power was another scholarly titan of the human soul, Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803–April 27, 1882), who tended to this question in a paper titled "Considerations by the Way,"
Emerson on Individual Uprightness and Opposing the Oppression of the Masses Emerson on Individual Uprightness and Opposing the Oppression of the Masses Reviewed by Read to Digest on 12:07 PM Rating: 5

No comments:

Powered by Blogger.